Summary

This trail is somewhat difficult to access, but if you can find it (and stay on it), you'll be treated to one of the best hikes in the Jackson Hole area: wildflowers aplenty and great views of the Tetons.

Time to Complete
Four hours to a full day
Distance from Downtown
10 miles from downtown
Get Directions
Difficulty
3 of 5

Recommended by Skinny Skis

Hiking Review

Sleeping Indian

Written by

Hiking up Sleeping Indian (11,239 feet) via Flat Creek Road, off the Elk Refuge, is between six and seven miles one-way. The climb is somewhere between 4,100 and 4,300 vertical feet, and the distance is just an estimation considering the trail isn’t actually signed. Without running, the trek to the summit takes about two hours, but you get slowed down a bit because there's roughly 800 feet in elevation for every mile, and there are tons of photo-worthy stopping points. 

Hit this hike during wildflower season, and it will blow your mind. Just try not to take 50+ photos per mile. Arrowleaf balsamroot. Wild roses. Lupine. And plenty of other colorful varieties. 

The parking area for this trail is 1.2 miles past the East Parking Lot on the Flat Creek Road. To get to the East Parking Lot, take Broadway Avenue to its end, turn left onto the Elk Refuge Road, take that several miles in and, instead of turning right to go up to Curtis Canyon, stay straight. The road is in pretty good shape – any kind of car can do it -- until just after the East Lot. From there, things get a little western, and high clearance vehicles become a priority. 

You’re there when a doubletrack splits off to the left. The trail starts at the end of this doubletrack, but you could be forgiven for thinking there's no trail at all, because when the flora is excessive, as it generally is all summer long, the trail is quite overgrown. The first 20 minutes ascend a lush gully and are the worst in terms of bush bashing. Just as the plant life begins to settle down, the trail becomes fairly steep. About 1,000 vertical feet up, you get your first good look toward the Tetons, but they'll be behind you. 

The trail weaves in and out of whitebark forests and through meadows of wildflowers. When you pop out on the Indian’s belly, it looks like you’re almost there, but you still have about 1,300 vertical feet to go. There’s a tiny bit of scrambling on loose rocks as you ascend the final 400 feet, but it doesn’t last long and a faint trail reappears there. If you lose it, just stay to the left, but not so far left you walk over the edge. The drop off Indian’s eastern side is steep and substantial.

A note to dog owners: there’s little to no water along the trail.

Image Gallery

Location

Get Directions
Seasonality
All Seasons
Best Time to Go
Spring and Summer
Land Website
http://www.jacksonholenet.com/mountains/sleeping_indian.php
Fees/Permit
None
Dog Friendly
Yes, but not much water for them.

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